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By Howard Johnson

"A major contribution to the historical past of the Caribbean and to the comparative research of slavery and transitions to loose hard work structures" (Nigel O. Bolland, Colgate University), this ebook "shifts the point of interest of curiosity from the islands' elites to the typical people...with detailed connection with the black populations" (Richard Sheridan, collage of Kansas at Lawrence).

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The Bahamas from slavery to servitude, 1783-1933

"A major contribution to the background of the Caribbean and to the comparative research of slavery and transitions to unfastened hard work platforms" (Nigel O. Bolland, Colgate University), this booklet "shifts the point of interest of curiosity from the islands' elites to the typical humans. .. with exact connection with the black populations" (Richard Sheridan, college of Kansas at Lawrence).

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Page 7 After the end of the War of the Spanish Succession (1702-13), the Bahamas emerged as a major base of piracy, which was essentially the continuation into peacetime of privateering activities. Piracy provided employment for ships and their crews that had previously been involved in privateering. The target of the pirates' attacks was the steadily increasing but as yet inadequately protected trade associated with the establishment of new colonies. The geographical character of the Bahamas, with cays and islands beyond the control of a Nassau-based government, made it an ideal site for pirates to shelter and lie in wait in.

They depend on their cargoes of salt, mahogany plank, dying wood, tortoises, fruit, etc. "14 After a four-month visit to New Providence in 1783, Johann David Schoepf described a colony that was in the process of breaking away from a pattern of economic stasis. He noted that the inhabitants preferred extractive economic activities to arduous agricultural pursuits and thus relied primarily on woodcutting, "wracking," turtling, and fishing and on privateering during wartime. Schoepf also pointed, however, to the beginnings of commercial agricultural activities that have usually been associated with the resettlement of American Loyalists in the Bahamas.

Although this system, described by Governor William Colebrooke as a "kind of modified slavery," was discontinued in 1838, it was reintroduced in 1860 in a form that constituted an officially approved truck system. Chapter 5 treats the development of labor tenancy and share systems as part of the general trend toward the redefinition of productive relationships in the years before 1838. These precapitalist modes of organizing labor were more widely adopted after 1838 and coexisted with wage labor.

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